Category: “Blog”

Recently Adopted Animals

Here are some of our recently adopted animals (list not all-inclusive):

April

April

Belle

Belle

Brooke

Brooke

Dillon

Dillon

Eden

Eden

Klaus

Klaus

Loki

Loki

Owen

Owen

Pebbles

Pebbles

Stormy

Stormy

What is a “No Kill” Shelter?

We have questions repeatedly about whether or not we are a No Kill shelter.  The answer is yes.  Here is a great link to PAWS Chicago explaining the difference between No Kill and Never Kill, which clarifies this issue:

http://www.pawschicago.org/no-kill-mission/about-no-kill/defining-no-kill/

 

No Kill shelters save healthy and treatable. They euthanize only Non-Rehabilitatable pets who are irremediably suffering or dangerous to people or other pets.
Never Kill shelters do not euthanize. In these shelters, animals are often left in cages for years without proper socialization and care. These shelters often have a large proportion of behaviorally dangerous and nonrehabilitatable dogs.
Traditional or “Open Door” private shelters take in all animals, regardless of the shelter’s capacity and resources to treat. Unless a No Kill community, these shelters manage their shelter population by euthanizing animals that are healthy or have treatable conditions.
Animal Control shelters are government impoundment agencies or private shelters who contract with the government. These shelters’ primary responsibility is animal control, keeping the streets clear of homeless animals and being the community’s clearing house for homeless or unwanted pets. These shelters have to be “Open Door” to perform their mission.

 

 

 

Adoption Event/Fundraiser July 4th 10 am till 2 pm at Ain’t It Qute Flea Market in Malvern

Ain’t It Qute in Malvern is hosting an adoption event and fundraiser for the Humane Society of Garland County on July 4th 10am-2pm!  Ain’t It Qute is an awesome new Flea Market located at 1528 Gardiner St, Malvern, AR, 72109, and it features lots of goodies, including antiques, collectibles, hand made goods & rare finds.  So come out and help us recycle and rescue!

 

aintitqute

Adoption/Fundraising Event at Garland County Library June 27

Penelope

Penelope

We are gearing up and getting excited about our Adoption/Fundraising event at the Garland County Library on Saturday, June 27 from 10 am till 3 pm. Our HSGC Bulldog mascot will be there to help us entertain the kiddos! We will have reading time from 11-11:30. We are accepting donations, and we will have some adoptable furry friends join us.  Hope to see you there!

RECENT ADOPTIONS

Great things continue to happen here at HSGC!  We recently rescued 18 dogs from euthanasia by collaborating with Hot Springs Animal Services through our Save A Life Program, as well as rescuing many more from homelessness and abandonment in the community.  This is truly a team effort for our community, and we really appreciate all your support!

Here are some pets recently adopted from HSGC (list not all-inclusive):

Cinda

Cinda

Catfish

Catfish

Spira

Spira

Byram

Byram

Truffles

Truffles

Tate

Tate

Farin and Falin

Farin and Falin

Ace

Ace

Tucker

Tucker

Bailey

Bailey

Silent Art Auction/Adoption Event at Hot Springs Farmer’s Market June 13

Catfish

Catfish, a male Brindle Chihuahua Mix

 

 

June 13, we will be hosting a silent art auction at the Hot Springs Farmer’s and Artisans Market to raise money for our kennel.  The auction will be held from 7 till noon.  A few of our adoptable animals will be joining us at 9 am.  Stop by and make bids on our art pieces!  All proceeds will benefit HSGC.

 

 

Recently adopted animals

Here are some of the animals recently adopted from our kennel.  This is not an all-inclusive list.  It only includes the animals who were previously listed as adopted on our website. We greatly appreciate the folks who gave these animals good homes!

Shiloh

Shiloh

Heidi

Heidi

Sophie

Sophie

Rachel

Rachel

Cassie

Cassie

Foxy

Foxy

GeiGing

GeiGing

Star

Star

Please join us for a fundraiser at Elks Lodge June 16 at 6:30 pm

emblem club taco saladHot Springs Emblem Club 194 is hosting a fundraiser for Humane Society of Garland County at Elks Lodge, 132 Abbott Place, Hot Springs AR 71913, on June 16th at 6:30 pm.  Tickets are now being sold-please see flyer for more details.  Take-outs are available.  Come out and support your local Humane Society and get some yummy food!  Hope to see you there!

 

Clarification: Humane Society of Garland County and Hot Springs Animal Control are two completely separate organizations

IMG_0744It seems that many people in the community are still confused regarding the role of Humane Society of Garland County.  We are a private, 100% donation-funded organization.  We do not receive any funding from taxpayers, the government, or the Humane Society of the US.  We depend entirely on the generosity of our donors and the proceeds from our thrift store to fund this organization.  We were founded in 1976, and we have provided thousands and thousands of needy animals with vet treatment and found homes for them.  This organization is a community effort, relying heavily on volunteers to continue its operation.  We constantly struggle to keep up with the demands to help needy animals, and we are always in need of more funds and more volunteers.  This organization can only do as much as our donations and our wonderful volunteers can handle.

Many people in the community continue to confuse us with Hot Springs Animal Services, which is a department of the City of Hot Springs. Animal Services enforces city and state animal laws and provides educational material for schools, civic clubs, and other groups. The division operates a humane shelter and handles cases involving stray or harmful animals.

So, what are some of the major differences between Humane Society of Garland County and Hot Springs Animal Services?

1. Animal Services is a government organization who must take in any animal surrendered to them, including injured and harmful animals.  Humane Society, being private, is able to screen animals, and we make every attempt to only take in animals who will be adoptable.  We are not required to take in aggressive or feral animals.  Again, Animal Control must take any animal surrendered to them.  If they have more animals than space, they have no choice but to put animals down.  If we have no space, we have no choice but to close our doors until we have adopted out enough animals to make space for new ones.  We do not euthanize animals to make space available for new ones.

2.  Animal Services enforces city and state animal laws.  Humane Society does not have the authority or the personnel to police neglect and abuse cases.  Please do not call Humane Society to report neglect and abuse cases, as we will refer you to the local Sheriff’s Dept.

3. Animal Services picks up stray, injured, abandoned, or harmful animals.   Animal Services has a 24 hour 365 day on call staff to address emergency issues.  501-262-2091 is the posted number.  Humane Society not have the personnel or resources to pick up any animals.  All animals must be approved by the Humane Society kennel manager prior to being taken in.  Humane Society does NOT pick up animals.  Please do not call Humane Society to report an injured or harmful animal, unless that animal has been previously adopted from the Humane Society.  We do not have an emergency nighttime number.

4.  Humane Society provides vetting, including spay/neuter, vaccinations, heartworm testing, and heart worm treatment if the animal tests positive, prior to adoption.  Animal Services provides vetting, include spay/neuter and vaccinations prior to adoption, but they do not test for heartworms.

5.  Humane Society has an open door policy, which means that, if you adopt an animal from us and it doesn’t work out for any reason, we will accept the animal back into our kennel and, barring any vicious or dangerous behavior, we will make attempts to adopt them into another home.

So, what are some of the major similarities between Humane Society and Animal Services?

1. Both are committed to placing as many animals as possible into safe, loving homes and in decreasing suffering and neglect of animals in our local community.

2. Both are committed to reuniting lost animals with owners within 5 days, and in rehoming those animals if no owner comes forward to claim them.

3. Both are committed to providing community awareness and education regarding animal welfare and safety.

Hopefully this will help clear up the confusion regarding the differences between these two organizations.

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